Friday, March 28, 2014

Seahawks Options For Adding Draft Picks


Seattle has seven picks in the upcoming NFL draft. Even a sharpshooter like John Schneider prefers to have more bullets in the clip than that. You can assume Schneider has an eye on adding picks this year. Let's take a look at some possible options the Seahawks GM has to accomplish the task.

Pete Carroll and Schneider made it clear last year that the team had reached a talent level that was going to make it difficult for rookies to make the roster. One would have thought that meant they would be more inclined to draft fewer players, either trading current picks for higher future picks, or possibly even combining picks to move up the draft. They did neither. In fact, they drafted more players in 2013 than in any draft since the duo took over the team.



YEAR DRAFT PICKS
2010 9
2011 9
2012 10
2013 11

The front office enters this year with just seven picks. They traded their 3rd round choice (#96) to Minnesota as part of the Percy Harvin deal, and got a 5th round pick (#146) from Oakland. The rest of the time, they will get the 32nd pick in each round. Compare that the 49ers, who have 12 picks total, including one in the 1st, two in the 2nd, and three in the 3rd. The Rams also have 12 draft choices, including two in the first 13 picks overall.

Seattle added two picks last year by trading back in the 2nd round with Baltimore and getting an additional 5th and 6th round pick. Then they traded to move up and draft Jesse Williams.

If the Seahawks wanted to add picks this year, here are some ways they could do it.

Trade Out Of The 1st Round

Sitting at #32 means the difference between your first round pick and a second round pick is next-to-nothing. That makes the value of the choice questionable in terms of reaping much reward for moving back. Using the draft value chart, the team would have to move back at least 12 spots to net a 3rd round pick. They could move back three or four spots and add a 4th round pick. That seems more likely. 

Trade Out Of The 2nd Round

They could move back 8-10 spots into the 3rd round and add a 4th round pick here. Or, they could 6-8 spots and add a 5th. Moving back 3-4 spots would bring back a 6th.

Stockpile 7th round picks

Seattle had four picks in the 7th round last year, and Schneider looks at those as early bets on undrafted free agents. Still, the team arguably found better value in the undrafted market in with Alvin Bailey, Benson Mayowa, and John Lotulelei than in the 7th. Although, Michael Bowie was their final selection. Greg Scruggs and J.R. Sweezy were 7th round picks in 2012. Malcolm Smith was a 7th round pick in 2011. 

Trade Robert Turbin

Turbin was a 4th round pick in 2012. He figures to be in a tough competition with Christine Michael for reps as a backup running back. He has flashed a little, and this is a weak running back draft. A team looking for depth at running back may be willing to surrender a 5th or 6th round pick for him straight-up, or he could be added to a deal to turn a 4th into a 3rd (or similar) from the trades above. 

Trade James Carpenter

Carpenter was a 1st round pick. He has been a part-time starter. He is in the last year of his deal. I doubt the team has him in their future plans. He might be worth something like what Turbin could bring back, or possibly a little more because of where he was drafted and the value of his position.

Trade Doug Baldwin

The likelihood of this has decreased dramatically after Golden Tate signed elsewhere. Still, the Seahawks may not have plans for Baldwin after this season, and might be willing to listen if someone made a very strong offer. That offer would have to be a 3rd round choice at least. 

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